meganbmoore: (book of life: elena)
 70 x The Book of Life
58 x Jack and the Cuckoo Clock Heart


here )
meganbmoore: (Default)
here )

I've barely had tie to more than speed skim any social media the last few weeks. Too tired from work to give it or reading the time and energy I used to. Hopefully that changes soon.
meganbmoore: (crossroads)
183 x Killjoys


here )
meganbmoore: (chae-ohk)
Continuing with comparing and contrasting Rebel: Thief Who Stole the People and Tree With Deep Roots, as of episode 14 of Tree. (More direct spoilers for both shows here than before, I think.)

here )
meganbmoore: (flower in prison: scenery)
I've been watching the 2011 sageuk Tree With Deep Roots, which is a political thriller about the creation of Hangul, which Six Flying Dragons is a prequel to. Tree should be watched before 6FD though. My first “I wish I’d watched this while it was airing” moment with it was the fight at the end of episode 7/beginning of episode 8. Because while I recognize that the flying/mid-air clashing effects were fairly advanced and cutting edge for 2011, they are…very dated, especially since I watched and rewatched the more advanced versions of that technology in Gil Dong and Mori’s fights in Rebel: Thief Who Stole the People earlier this year.



Speaking of Rebel, as I’ve been discussing with @dingax, who I’m watching Tree with, Tree is almost an inversion of Rebel. Or more accurately, Rebel is an inversion of Tree.



spoilers for both series )
meganbmoore: (Default)
For the interested, Netflix just added the cdramas King’s War (more commonly known as The Legend of Chu and Han) and Qin Empire Alliance (Which I THINK is the first of a now 3-part collection of series about the Qin Empire, but I’m not 100% certain-King’s War was easier to figure out because it has Peter Ho, whose series are easy to find descriptions of).


I don’t know who else pays attention to Netflix foreign acquisitions, but I do and it’s been...interesting. They’ve had a ton of Mexican telenovelas for ages and they used to have a lot of major network kdramas, a well as a lot of Taiwanese and Chinese dramas, but those dwindled down to almost nothing a while back. Then I think around the middle of last year, they started adding a lot of Turkish and Indian series-I’ve added some of these to my queue, but all I’ve watched so far is the first 11 episodes of Razia Sultan*, which I really like, but am stretching out as far as I can because there’s a lot more episodes that they haven’t added yet- and they started slowly replenishing their Korean and Chinese series selection, though they’re sadly light on historical and fantasy Chinese dramas, and the only sageuk they had is Tamra, which I’ve never managed to finish the first episode of. The last few weeks, though, they’ve been pretty much flooding the new additions with Chinese and Korean dramas. The Korean dramas are mostly cable network shows, particularly franchises-I Need Romance, Reply and Let’s Eat- and they’ve been pretty steadily adding Naver webseries for a while, so they probably did bulk purchasing from a couple of production companies, though they've also been purchasing exclusive international licensing for several series in recent months. The cdramas appear to be more random and a lot of them are ones I’ve never heard of, but I’m assuming there was similar bulk purchasing involved there. There have been some historical cdramas in the mix, but aside from the 2 I mentioned at the beginning and Ice Fantasy, they’ve been set in the 30s and 40s, and those tend to end up fairly heavy with the political propaganda.


There haven’t been too many series that I want to see added on the cdrama or kdrama front during this recent spurt, but I’m hoping this means more shows that I want to see will be added eventually, especially some of the recent cdramas that neither Viki nor DramaFever got.


*I should mention that there’s a truly cringeworthy quest arc at the beginning that I probably only got through because I’ve encountered far worse in anime and some cdramas, and the villains are sadly cartoonishly one note, but otherwise, it’s quite enjoyable.
meganbmoore: (Default)
 PSA that both youtube and hulu have the unaired episode of Powerless that gueststars Adam West, for other fans of the show. or the actor.
meganbmoore: (parker and sophie)
Last weekend I watched all the available episodes of Lookout, and this weekend I’ve watched 7 episodes of Bad Thief, Good Thief (I had already seen and enjoyed the first 3 episodes well enough, but wasn’t invested yet.) For other kdrama fen who got over-invested in Rebel: Thief Who Stole the People, both of these series are pretty good followup series, though neither is a sageuk.



Neither series is perfect, but qualify for “Korean Leverage of my heart and soul” status. Bad Thief, God Thief, IMO, should have held off on various revelations until later on, and Lookout is...very clearly by a newbie writer at times-the male lead is over-complicated ( as opposed to complex) in that way where “morally ambiguous” becomes “convoluted and will anyone buy redemption at this point?” (the right actor could pull it off, but while this actor does smarmy well, he doesn’t have the screen presence and charisma to quit pull it off) and things don’t always come together the way the writer thinks they do. Bad Thief Good Thief has the more expansive and complicated plot tied to current and past politics (and almost 4 times as many episodes) but takes a few episodes to get going. It has a lot of narrative similarities to Rebel, and a few spoilery things actually had me looking to see if the two shows shared and production members or writers, but that doesn’t seem to be the case. They do share several actors, though. Lookout is much more fast paced with action scenes and a heroine who regularly is a gallant knight in shining armor rescuing other women.



They both get the “It” that Leverage had* but most shows of the type miss. That “It” is that it isn’t just cool people being attractive and witty and competent. It’s a wish fulfillment fantasy that there is someone who will see to it that the people who the law can’t or won’t punish will still be punished, an justice will be met. This is also the general “Robin Hood” fantasy, though the dynamics play out differently when it’s in a historical setting than when it’s in modern times.



Unsurprisingly, both shows, like Rebel before them, are from MBC. While SBS is floundering all over the place to figure out how to still mostly depend on an international audience when they’ve lost their biggest outlet (China) and KBS is...doing something (Like, I dunno. They aren’t the mess that SBS is, but they seem trying really hard to make their mark different kinds of dramas this year more than usual, with mixed results.) MBC is pretty much running around yelling “VIVE LA REVOLUTION” at the top of its lungs. (Ruler: Master of the Mask is also pretty heavy on the political commentary, but it’s much more focused on “Puppet ruler under the control of unseen master, BAD IDEA” while Rebel, Lookout and Bad Thief Good Thief focus more on widespread corruption and abuse of power and social standing.)



As an aside, Lookout might require trigger/upsetting stuff warnings beyond what you’d expect for these kinds of political thrillers.



*ok, Leverage had several “It”s that other similar shows lack, but I’m talking about a specific “It” here.
meganbmoore: (hwajung: jeongmyung revealed)
See this poster for the newly-airing sageuk, Seven Day Queen? This poster is very pretty, and makes me very angry.




Park Min Young may be in the center, and she may be playing the title character, but she isn’t the POINT of the poster. She’s demurely looking down and away, and almost seems incidental to the poster. See Yeon Woo Jin and Lee Dong Gun there? they’re both looking directly at the viewer, and their eyes are ALMOST level. Not quite, and noticeably not actually level with each other, but close enough that, with both looking at you, THAT’s what demands the viewer’s attention, with Park Min Young conveniently positioned well below that focal point. The message the poster sends is perfectly clear regardless of if you know anything about the plot: The men are the point, their relationship or conflict is what’s important. The woman is there as the love interest for one or both, but not the point. or the show. (To be fair, while this is the poster for the show I’ve seen the most, it isn’t the only one. The other posters are better in that she’s more of a focus, but they’re also very clearly focused on the romance, and don’t give her the gravity or import that this poster gives the men.)



This has been aggravating me since it first showed up, and the previews (after the first with all the quick cuts and the white color scheme) only furthered the impression. I still held out hope (and still do-it was my most anticipated of the current crop of kdramas) despite the steadily increasing unease the promotional materials gave me, but the first episode seemed to reinforce that impression, with most of the gravitas of the episode of the conflict between King Yeonsan and Lee Yook/future-King Jungjong and their issues with each other and Yeonsan’s daddy issues. Our Heroine was endearing and plucky, but almost incidental to most of the plot in the episode, despite supposedly being the main character. As I said when I watched the first episode over the weekend, I’m hoping that the focus readjusts itself once the childhood parts are over and it ends up the show it could be instead of the show I fear it will be.



more sageuk babble )

ETA:

Compare that poster to this poster of MBC's Hwajung (another drama about a female historical figure who rarely gets used in dramas set in her time period) from two years ago:



Once again, we have the female lead (and the series actually was originally titled Princess Jungmyung) centered between two of the male leads, and standing in front on them.  However,  Lee Yeon Hee is roughly eye level with Cha Seung Won and Kim Jae Won, and she is looking directly at the viewer.  Despite being outnumbered two-to-one, she is clearly the focus of the poster, and there's no doubt she's the lead and that this is her story, with the men playing parts in it.  Mind you the relationships are different-while there is romance and a romantic triangle (tough very one-sided) in Hwajung, neither of these men are involved in it.  One plays Jungmyung's older half brother, while the other plays her nephew (who is older than her, because, I mean, Korean Royals...) but the point and difference remain the same.



Profile

meganbmoore: (Default)
meganbmoore

August 2017

S M T W T F S
  12 345
678 9101112
1314 1516 171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Aug. 22nd, 2017 06:26 pm
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios